Tech support scams have become the top phishing threats

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Hackers are also targeting gift cards this holiday season because they are less secure than credit cards and are not tied to a specific person’s name.

Tech support scams, which often arrive as pop-up notifications alerting users of a compromised network, have become a popular phishing method, according to security firm Norton LifeLock.

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The company said it blocked more than 12.3 million technical support URLs for 13 consecutive weeks between July and September of this year.

These attacks are effective because they exploit consumer fear, uncertainty, and doubt to trick recipients into believing that they face a serious cybersecurity threat. What’s more, the alerts are cleverly disguised using big tech companies, the report notes.

The firm has also observed other targeted attacks on the rise. For example, a new phishing campaign was specifically designed to obtain player login credentials and two-factor authentication information for the purpose of stealing and selling rare and high-value virtual items such as merchandise. Game.

Another popular phishing campaign targeted bank customers with a carbon copy of the real bank homepage to trick them into entering their credentials. Hackers are also targeting gift cards this holiday season because they are less secure than credit cards and are not tied to a specific person’s name.

“Awareness is the best defense against these targeted attacks. Never call a number listed in a tech support pop-up, and instead contact the company directly through their official website to validate the situation and next steps, ”added Darren Shou, Chief Technology Officer, Norton LifeLock .


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